High Altitude Poodle

In Sweden the word poodle is used in two ways. One way is the dog , the other is linked to when you have to give up an earlier strong position. In public. The expression came from a press conference in 2002 with a minister that had the bravery , or  at least  strategical insight , to realise that the only way out was to recant  and act humble. It was described by a journalist as a ” full poodle , all four paws in  the air , asking for forgiveness” . The expression ( ” att göra en pudel ” ) stuck.

 

In Britain today the National Health Service is in the very slow,  discreet process of making a poodle re their guidelines on fluid intake & prevention of altitude sickness.

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2008

“Minimum 4-6 liters per day”

This was the NHS  standard recommendation from the turn of the millenium – for any altitude , any activity . One group that would be  puzzled by this advice was historically  aware climbers , familiar with the new concepts that took Hillary & Tenzing to the top of Mt Everest : the fluid rations were around three liters per day.

Another group were those who had attended the altitude health lecture run by in Pheriche ( alt. 4200-ish ) on the Everest trek , by by the docs from Himalayan Rescue Association. Then and now they talked about avoiding both de- and overhydration , and a base recommendation of around three liters of fluids per day.

 

 

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2014

“Plenty of fluids”

In 2014 NHS changed course , for reasons unkown  , by going to ” drink plenty of fluids”.

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2017

“Drink enough”

Now who could argue with that ? The Scots , as in the Scottish NHS Fit for Travel site , sought a new quarrrel with the sassenach and allied with Himalayan Rescue Association etc : maintain a good intake , and avoid an excessive one.

The stakes involved , and the reason why for example the Himalayan Rescue Association and the Institute for Altitude Medicine warns against talking about fluid intake with no upper limit , is best described by one of the proponents of a high fluid intake.

Enter  Dr Stephen Bezruchka , with a short chilling remark in Altitude Illness – Prevention & Treatment” :

“Like any advice it can be overdone and people have died from drinking too much water.”

 

 

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